Tag: uk unemployment

Mind The Gap: How Do We Deal With The UK Skills Shortage?

It appears that the issue of a skills shortage in the UK workforce is not going away. Instead it is becoming an increasing concern for business owners and economists, who see a lack of skilled workers as one of the greatest threats to the country’s economic growth.

And not just that, a lack of skills in a workforce can lead to other employees picking up the slack, which creates all sorts of issues around motivation and morale.

Identifying the problem is easy, finding a solution is far more challenging.

So, what can we do about it?

A report by the UK Commision for Employment in Skills in December 2014 made five recommendations for action, putting the onus on employers to lead on skills development, with government support. The report highlighted the need for more quality ‘earning and learning’ routes, like apprenticeships, better management, better job design and increased employee engagement.

“Employers need online recruitment processes to be straightforward, streamlined and suitable for their business needs.”

But when it comes to recruitment it is important to understand what’s working, and what isn’t. Employers need online recruitment processes to be straightforward, streamlined and suitable for their business needs. That means not just aligning with business goals, but also demonstrating an impact on them.

At a time when hiring the right people is more important than ever, one size will not simply fit all.

It is crucial to have a plan from the start of any recruitment campaign, from how, where and when to search for candidates, to screening requirements, interview and offer processes. Without a clearly defined strategy, time-consuming and costly mistakes can be made. And, for small and medium sized businesses, the risk and reward of necessary growth vs. the challenges of recruitment can feel like an uphill struggle. For ambitious SMEs, finding the right people must sit at the top of the priority list and and, against a backdrop of a competitive and unskilled market, this can be a genuine worry for business owners.

A map being read

The good news? The High Growth Small Business Report (2014) highlighted the value of Britain’s fastest growing smaller businesses, as critical to economic prosperity. Representing just 1% of UK businesses and only 3.4% of the total UK economy, these companies generated 36% of UK economic growth last year and created two in three new jobs (68%) between 2012 and 2013, totaling over 250,000 jobs across the UK.

So, if the power really is in your hands, how do we support the growth of SMEs?

Speaking to employers about the barriers to recruitment led to the development of the Campaign Builder: a simple way for employers to create their campaign and get a transparent upfront quote. Simply pick your requirements from the campaign planner list and we do the rest, removing the hassle and confusion around the process, the very things that can baffle new employers and slow down the search for the right candidate.

A combination of effective recruitment strategies, internal training and investment in ‘earning and learning’ will help to kickstart the skills shortage in the UK. But as employers and agencies, we all need to be on board. Identifying the right candidates against clearly defined job descriptions and supporting the workforce to increase productivity will be crucial. And ensuring that process is as simple and transparent as possible will make all the difference. It is certainly time for employers and agencies to work together to help plug the skills gap and take some joint responsibility for the country’s economic growth.

After all, there is no more important asset for any business, than its people.

 


Are graduates turning into job snobs?

There’s been a lot of online hype recently regarding graduates and their attitude towards work. In a recent interview with the BBC, recruitment expert Norman Rose claimed “Out of work graduates guilty of “job snobbery” by rejecting offers of work that they deem too menial”. He also added: “People think because they have a degree or a qualification they should not go for anything other than their line of expertise.”

His comments came as a reaction to newly released official figures from The Office for National Statistics (ONS). The figures reveal that unemployment in the younger generation is rising back towards one million, with unemployment amongst 16-24-year-olds growing by 15,000 to reach 973,000 in the last quarter.

Mr Rose’ comments sparked a great debate around the UK with arguments both for an against his opinion.

Arguments for his case include the fact that in the current economy and an intensely competitive UK jobs market, it’s far more beneficial to have a job for which you are overqualified than to have no job at all – at least you’ll earn some valuable experience which can help you get your foot in the door when applying for a different, more suited job.

Whilst in contrast, Shadow Employment Minister Stephen Timms, responded to the Mr Rose’ criticism by saying: “It’s not fair to accuse young people of job snobbery when youth unemployment is edging back towards a million. Many are desperate for a job, but government programmes are letting them down.”

What do you think? Are graduates being too fussy? Have you say below in the comments section…


UK Unemployment Figure Drops By a massive 49,000

Whilst the rewards reaped by their colleagues in the banking industry recent  may have been the subject of much speculation, its fair to say that if stats are anything to go by then the staff in the recruitment industry have certainly earnt their bonuses this year! Recent figures released by the office for national statistics indicate that the employment rate for those aged from 16 to 64 for July to September 2012 was 71.2 per cent, up 0.2 from April to June 2012. There were 29.58 million people in employment aged 16 and over, up 100,000 from April to June 2012. Looks like someone must of been doing something right hey?

The finding also highlighted the facts that the UK unemployment rate for July to September 2012 was 7.8% of the economically active population, down 0.2% from April to June 2012. In total there were 2.51 million unemployed people, down a whopping 49,000 from April to June 2012.

The inactivity rate for those aged from 16 to 64 for July to September 2012 was 22.6 per cent, down 0.1 from April to June 2012. There were 9.07 million economically inactive people aged from 16 to 64, down 25,000 from April to June 2012.

If only pay figures were in correlation with these figures, because between July to September 2011 and July to September 2012, total pay (including bonuses) rose by 1.8 per cent and regular pay (excluding bonuses) rose by 1.9 per cent.

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