Tag: Human Resources

5 Recruitment Mistakes You Could Be Making

5 recruitment mistakes you could be making (and how to avoid them)

In today’s job market, candidates hold more power than ever before. For recruiters, this means more pressure to impress job hunters and make the hire quickly and efficiently. But are you doing everything you possibly can to stand-out from the competition and recruit the best talent?

According to data from CV-Library, poor hiring decisions can cost businesses up to £15,000 a year. What’s more, candidates are admitting that there are certain areas that put them off applying for jobs. Below, we explain the 5 recruitment mistakes that you could be making and how you can avoid them.

Poorly constructed job adverts

A staggering 94.7% of candidates say they’re more likely to apply for a role that has a clear job description. And who can blame them? A well-written job advert will naturally be more inviting because it clearly outlines who your company is, why you are hiring and what the position involves.

Follow this format and you’ll stand a better chance of boosting your application rates. This involves bullet pointing out the key responsibilities of the role, as well as the key skills and qualifications needed. You should round off the job advert with a quick mention of what the candidate can gain from working for you – this is also a good opportunity to shout about any workplace perks you offer your employees.

Lengthy application process

It’s important to remember that your job advert and application process are the first impression a candidate will have of your company. Therefore, you need to make it as engaging as possible. Think about your application process: how long is it? Is it easy to navigate? What are candidates required to do?

What’s more, think about the fact that more candidates are searching and applying for jobs on mobile. If they aren’t able to apply for your roles through their devices, they may end up abandoning the entire application. Think about how you can make it more efficient. Do you need so many screening questions? What information do you really want to gain in the initial stages?

Too many interviews

Research tells us that a lengthy recruitment process puts off candidates. While it’s important to ensure that you have an effective screening process, consider how multi-stage interviews may be viewed by candidates. For example, do you require a candidate to complete a telephone interview, an initial face-to-face interview, a second interview, and a final interview?

This may be necessary for some roles, particularly more senior positions. However, you should be able to get a good idea of how suitable a candidate will be from a telephone interview and a face-to-face meeting. If your hiring process has too many stages for candidates, they may become impatient, or get snapped up by someone else.

Slow response rate

How quickly are you getting back to candidates? In such a competitive market, you can’t afford to take weeks deciding on whether you want to hire someone or not. Nowadays, it’s likely that job hunters will be juggling multiple offers. Therefore, it’s important to feedback to candidates in a timely manner.

What’s more, even if you aren’t going to offer someone the job, keep them updated and provide constructive feedback. Employer branding is extremely important in today’s labour market and you need to make a good impression.

Offer the best package

Last, but not least, consider the packages that you’re offering to candidates. Are you making an offer they can’t refuse? As mentioned earlier, the market is competitive, so you need to stay on top of what your competitors are offering and really think about what will set you apart from the crowd.

Overall, it’s clear that there are certain areas which could be affecting your recruitment efforts. Getting the hiring process right is extremely important and certainly worth the investment. Especially if you want to attract the best talent in 2018.

Author: CV-Library – The UK’s leading independent job board https://www.cv-library.co.uk/

 

Could Flat Fee Recruitment Benefit Your Business?


The EU Referendum: Pros & Cons for UK Human Resources and Recruitment Industries

As arguments for and against Brexit are gaining pace ahead of the national EU Referendum on June 23rd 2016, consideration needs to be given to UK employers, the effect on them, and the knock on effect on UK Human Resources Departments and the Recruitment Industry. Whichever way the EU referendum goes, it will have consequences for UK employers.

Take a Look at History

A dominant swathe of those eligible to vote in the EU Referendum in June were not eligible voters back in 1973 when the UK entered the European Union. This has two-fold power. Firstly, this age group of voters are the current working generation, many responsible for business and with it recruitment and employment law and regulations. Secondly, these voters mostly won’t remember what Britain looked like on the outside of the EU looking in.

To understand the implications of Brexit and the EU Referendum now it is important to look at it within the social, political and economic political climate of the pre-EU days. In the heart of the Thatcher era, private business was king. With the entry in to the EU in 1973, the effects weren’t just apparent directly on the economy and trade, but also in a more subtle and slower way through the legal effect of EU treaties gradually making their way in to EU law.

eu-bank-note

Europe: The Issue for Employers, Human Resources and Recruitment Industries

The biggest implications of the EU on UK employers and therefore their Human Resources departments and the wider recruitment industry needs to be looked at within two key contexts: Employment Law and The Job Market.

Europe and Employment Law

Without a shadow of a doubt, the UK’s Employment Law landscape would look enormously different without the direct influence and implications of being part of the EU. The main Employment Law areas covered by EU legislation include:

  • Working Time Regulations 1998 – whilst the UK negotiated various Opt-Outs and Exemptions, the UK is still largely subject to the weekly maximum hours, rest break and holiday entitlements, as dictated by the EU. One of the key reasons the UK negotiated the Opt-Outs and Exemptions was precisely because of UK business concern that such restrictions would hinder UK businesses, damage their profitability, and make working environments too restrictive. However, we were able to negotiate the Opt-Outs, and long-term our competitive edge hasn’t been affected.
  • Equality Act 2010 – the EU is largely responsible for bringing the UK fully in line with the rest of the Western World when it comes to discrimination. The Equality Act protects individuals from discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, religion, belief, disability, age, sexual orientation and gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnerships. Without a shadow of a doubt, this Act has made the workplace one that is fairer, and brings in valuable talent previously overlooked due to discrimination.
  • Agency Workers Regulations 2010 – these regulations give Agency workers in the UK the right to equal treatment as that of their permanent counterparts. This obviously has a knock on effect for Recruitment Agencies looking to fill temporary agency positions.
  • Part Time Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 – regulations to ensure that part-time employees’ employment rights are protected enabling UK businesses to benefit from more flexible working patters, especially making it possible to make the best possible business use of women returning to work after having children, bolstering the economy overall.
  • Fixed Term Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2002 – similar to the Part Time Employees Regulations, these regulations brought in from the EU help to ensure the UK workplace is fair for all.

On top of the above laws and regulations, the reach of the EU is completely intertwined with UK Employment Law. Europe is responsible for bringing us Maternity Leave Rights (protecting both the individual and the employer) Parental Leave rights, further pay equality than the UK’s own previous laws, Data Protection, Redundancy Consultation, TUPE (Transfer of Private Undertakings), Health and Safety, and Human Rights. All these areas of law are governed by, or largely affected by, EU directive.

All the while the UK remains in the EU then UK business has a voice in the shaping of these regulations. A worrying scenario would be if the UK went down the Norwegian route and the UK was still governed and restricted by these laws, but without the power to influence them going forward. At present, UK business has a strong voice in the EU. Remove this and UK business could find itself hindered.

Europe and Jobs

The Office of National Statistics tells us that 942,000 Eastern Europeans, Romanians and Bulgarians work within the UK. However, these figures can’t be looked at in isolation. The UK plays host to a further 791,000 western European workers. But this figure still pales in comparison to the number of workers the UK has from outside of the EU – a whopping 2.93m, from places such as China and India. These figures need to be considered as a whole, and why the UK economy is currently reliant on non-UK workers.

Working in Human Resources or Recruitment yourself, you have likely been faced with skills shortages from within the UK market alone which you can more easily fill from abroad. This ability to recruit from beyond our own borders gives us economic power. Professor Adrian Favell, from the London School of Economics, says that limiting freedom of movement and employment would deter the brightest and the best that enter the UK from the EU.

Without this freedom of movement the UK employers may have to move to other lower cost, more competitive EU countries. The car manufacturing industry has already hinted at this possibly knock-on effect of leaving the EU. In a slightly different vein, UK farmers would struggle even further if EU subsidies were removed.

Europe for Recruiters: To Stay or Go

There are pros and cons for both camps. The reality is that even if we exited Europe, we aren’t operating in the political and economic climate of the 1970s. We’re now in the digital age, and it seems to remain competitive then we have to utilise Europe to the best of our advantage, whether that’s staying in or getting out. We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below.


Recruitment Trends to Come in 2016

Recruitment Trends 2016

The Christmas break is an important time for recruiters to review how they’ve done in the past year and to look forward to that all-important future. With employment levels rising and competition for jobs becoming slightly less drastic, standing out from the crowd is going to be the name of the game in 2016 with recruiters working hard to incorporate new technology, find the high performing candidates and deliver the top notch service that many businesses are looking for. To help you stay ahead of your competition, we’ve compiled a list of what we think will be the top recruitment trends in 2016.

Measuring Performance

A chart measuring the success of a recruitment campaign

If recruiters are going to find the right top performers for their clients in 2016 there is going to have to be a good deal of soul searching and measuring of outcomes. That’s going not only going to involve monitoring recruitment processes but how accepted candidates perform on the job and whether they succeed, fail or move quickly onto somewhere else. Weak hires that only benefit a company for a short while are going to impact on recruitment agencies particularly now that the market is becoming more buoyant. This may well involve working closely with the hiring managers of particular customers and ensuring that bad practice is eschewed for good that produces positive outcomes.

There’s no doubt that in 2016 recruiters are going to drill down deeper into how, where, when and why they choose their best candidates.

A More Scientific Approach

There has been a much bigger push by companies to be more diverse in their employment selection over the last couple of years which has led to some opting for CVs that have no evidence of sex, age, race or gender and for interviews that are carried out, for example, by telephone or even with the panel of judges keeping the backs to the candidates. Recruitment firms are also embracing this kind of procedure which is intended to get rid of any unconscious bias on the part of the interview or selection panel.

2016 will see more initiatives such as this as mainstream employers try to follow the tech industry and force a more diverse employment profile.

Being More Innovative

An innovative building design

Finding the people who can innovate in the workplace is going to be a key concern for many businesses. It’s no longer simply desirable to hire a steady Eddie who can come in and get the day’s work done, many posts now rely on a significant amount of project management and thought creation that can help drive the company forward. Innovators are likely to be more demanding too, wanting tweaks to the job description and package before they agree to go and work for someone. That’s something recruiters will have to learn to cope with better.

Selling Clients Better

Finding the top talent around, at the right time for businesses who need it, has always been a big issue with recruitment agencies. 2016 could well be the time for many to go back to basics and ensure that the sales and recruitment skills of their own staff are up to the mark. With more jobs out there and plenty of well qualified candidates, it’s going to come down to who finds the right people more often for the right jobs. That means selling those potential opportunities much better.

Videos That Sell

A recruitment campaign video being recorded

While attracting high value candidates is going to be the name of the game this year, there are plenty of opportunities for recruiters to set out their potential offers in more dramatic and eye catching ways. One solution may well be the greater use of videos in recruitment, from slick, professionally produced adverts through to staff YouTube channels that show the day to day working of a company. We are more likely to click on a video upload than to click on a link nowadays and with smartphones practically a staple of modern life, top potential candidates can be reached in much more efficient and more interesting ways.

Adding Pep to Job Descriptions

Standardised and largely boring job descriptions may have to go out of the window if you are going to attract the best candidates and taking a fresh look at how you word things is likely to be important. They’re still going to need to be accurate, as misleading ads will generally lead to disappointment and a quick, unwanted turnover, but the crux of the matter is that recruiters need to engage and bring the benefits of each job out much better than in 2016.

Companies Must be Mobile

A mobile device

Everyone, let’s face it, is going mobile. If a top performer is working without the use of a smartphone, then something has to be seriously wrong. The number of job seekers who use mobile devices to enable their search for the ideal position is increasing, up to almost 50% at the moment. The vital thing here is that the phone is always with them and if you want to have the best opportunity for engaging and bringing them on board, your systems need to be ultra-mobile friendly. This may well be a case of investing more money in IT infrastructure over the coming year but the expenditure will be well worth it.

Faster Working

The early bird catches the worm and nowhere is this more obvious than in the recruiting business. The top performers are hot property and if you want to get them then you have to work fast, close them down and convince them of your credentials before anyone else moves in. You may think that you are offering a candidate the best deal on the market but they are not going to wait for ever. Sometimes they are not even willing to wait a week. Top performers tend to make quick decisions and if you are delaying for any reason then it can hamper your chances of sealing the deal.

This year many recruitment agencies will be looking to speed up their processes. While this may prove difficult with a number of larger companies who have their own processes to go through, recruiters will need to impress on the need to fast track when it comes to the top candidates.

Faster working, more mobile friendly approaches, better measurement and a selection approach that meets diversity issues are all in the frame for this new year. While you may be thinking that you will get round to some of these changes in the near future, your competitors could be implementing the strategies that work right this minute.


5 ways to boost staff morale this Christmas

With parties to attend and extra shopping to taken care of, you can be forgiven for being busy during the next few weeks. However, if you’re responsible for looking after staff morale this festive season, it’s important not to neglect them and their feelings. Failing to do so can impact office morale and productivity, so try these easy to implement tips to boost office spirits this Christmas.

xmas-holly

 

Throw a Christmas party

Everybody loves to boogie right? So to do your staff! Award their efforts this year with a party, allowing them to let their hair down and blow off some steam. A recent survey concluded that 1 in 6 companies use Christmas parties as a way of increasing morale within their company. Just be sure to film the guy who makes a clown of himself for even more laughs in the new year.

Decorate the office

It’s no secret that well-designed office spaces can increase employee morale and productivity. If your office space isn’t up to scratch aesthetically, now’s a great time to do something about it(even if it’s just temporary). Your staff will be walking around town on a daily basis, being subjected to the constant visual stimuli of decorated street lights, shop windows and makeshift Christmas trees, only to turn up to an office which unless you’ve seen to it will be dull and downright depressing in comparison.

 

So dig out the tinsel, buy a tree, burn some cinnamon candles and make things a little bit brighter for your employees. Even if the changes are subtle, it will help to boost morale and take thoughts of that 200 page report that needs to be done for Monday.

 

Play some Christmas classics in the office

“Without music, life would be a mistake” – Friedrich Nietzsche

Music and the mind go hand in hand and there’s a lot of science to back this up. You may have the next Britains Got Talent winner sat within your realms and you didn’t know about it! That said, bring out the CD player this festive season, get the office geek to burn a compilation disc(all legit of course) full of the cheesiest Christmas classics around and pump it out amongst the office. People will soon start tapping their foot, throwing a few fist pumps out there. Even if they’re not to everyone’s taste, it will certainly get them chatting as they get on their high horses to slate the downfalls of the song.

Here are some of the tracks which we have on repeat in the Net-Recruit office during the festive period:

 

 

Consider bringing payday forward

December brings an unavoidable increase in social activities. Trips to the local Christmas Markets, unplanned Mulled Wine Nights and trips to the pub which wouldn’t normally occur. All of these things can tighten the Christmas purse strings even further. If it’ financially feasible, take a look at bringing the monthly pay day forward a week, allowing your staff to purchase some last minute stocking fillers or perhaps have that tipple with an old friend which they may not have been able to do otherwise.

Organise a Secret Santa

Who doesn’t love gifts? More so, who doesn’t love a surprise? A secret Santa allows people to get creative and buy for somebody who they wouldn’t normally consider. It will also get your staff chatting around the kettle, as they try and discover what interests a colleagues, who they perhaps might not normally speak to in such detail. Winner! Be sure to set a limit so that your employees don’t have to spend the earth,  check out these top Secret Santa Gift Ideas for under £10.

So there you have it, 5 easy to implement ways of boosting morale within your company this Christmas. By sending your team off for the Christmas break in a high spirits, they are more than likely to come back fired up and ready to tackle the New Year head on.


When recruitment goes wrong

Don’t tell anyone that we told you, but recruitment is pretty scary. And we aren’t talking about your candidates’ sweaty palms before an interview. Whether it’s the responsibility of HR, in-house recruitment teams or your partner agency, the whole process is challenging from start to finish. Because it is important to get it right.

And, when it goes wrong, it can go spectacularly wrong.

Man holding head after an epic recruitment failure

We have been looking at the biggest factors that can send your recruitment campaign spiralling out of control, and how you can manage them. Because, when it comes to getting it right, we know how to keep those recruitment demons at bay…

1. Too few candidates.

Here’s one that’s bound to get your heart racing. Is it me? Is it us? Was it something I said?
You put your job ad out with all the confidence in the world but nobody is ‘swiping right’ on your company. Gutted. Here’s where your arsenal of online recruitment tools come in. One of the biggest factors in recruiting the wrong person is that there simply wasn’t enough choice in the first place. So, cast your net wide but still set your campaign out in a targeted way from the start. Use our Campaign Builder to make sure you are communicating the right message to the right person at the right time. And then you can feel safe in the knowledge that your decision is an informed one, and not about picking the best of a bad bunch. That kind of relationship is never going to last.

2. Too many cooks.

Having everyone involved in every stage of the recruitment process may feel like the right way to go about things. And it would be, if everyone could agree about everyone they met. But too many subjective opinions too early on can confuse matters and send your tightly planned campaign way off track. Our advice? Ask yourself some precise questions and stick to them: who really counts in this process and at what stage? As specialists in the online recruitment process we can guide you through the entire process, vetting and filtering candidates as we go, so your team can work on a far more productive ‘need to know’ basis, saving everyone a lot of potential arguments. For us, it starts with getting under the skin of your existing company structure, so we ask the important questions first, saving you time and money in the long run.

3. References? What references?

The best of the best recruiters do not see references as a final ‘sign off’, they uncover and use information they get from referees to inform their decision. Too often recruitment processes play ‘tick box’ with this most useful and informative part of the process. That’s why we spend time investigating references and, crucially, asking the right questions. Because, if anyone knows, it’s the previous employers. And it’s not just about finding out whether your candidate was forthcoming on the brew round (although, obviously, that’s going to be part of it…)

4. Say what you want…

It might be crystal clear to you, but is that job description really worded correctly for the type of people you want to attract? Whether it is a new or existing role, taking the time to get all the information down in a structured and thought out way could be the difference between your dream candidate picking up the phone, or not. And, trust us, there’s a skill to it. Start by being as open as possible. The recruitment process should not be the test, leave that to the interview. Lay it all on the line and be transparent. The right candidates will thank you for it.

5. Past experience vs. future potential

How you analyse applicants based on their experience or what they could bring to your business can feel like a bit of a tightrope. Pay more for the old dog who may be reluctant to learn new tricks or invest in the young pup who hasn’t been tried and tested? This comes down to the person and there can be no hard and fast rules. Just go in with your eyes open and remember, if it feels right, it probably is.

For every job role, every business and every candidate the recruitment process can feel like a minefield. And mistakes can be costly. At Net Recruit our approach is built upon understanding your business and the potential pitfalls from the start. Then we create a campaign that helps you minimise the scary bits to ensure you arrive at the best results. So, stop hiding under the duvet. Let’s beat the recruitment monsters together.

Find out more by following us on twitter or checking out our easy to use Campaign Builder.



Flat Fee Recruitment, what is it?

Flat Fee Recruitment does exactly what it says on the tin; Outsourced Recruitment which is charged for as a basic upfront fee rather than as a percentage of salary for services rendered after an appointment has been made.

The reason that many companies choose to go down this Flat Fee Recruitment route rather than using a traditional recruiter is usually to do with cost: a typical Flat Fee Recruiter will be able to buy job credits from numerous job boards at a fraction of the cost an employer could do for a single vacancy and in most cases will pass some of the savings on to the recruiting company.

Advantages of Flat Fee Recruitment

A job vacancies posting purchased through a Flat Fee Recruiter will usually be placed on to numerous job boards at a cost which is similar to the fee an employer would be charged to place their vacancy on to a single job board; this makes it a very attractive proposition if price is your sole concern.

Another advantage to Flat Fee Recruitment for employers who have multiple positions to fill is that if you have to find, for instance, five Sales Executives, you should be able to fill these positions with just one advertisement and only pay the up-front fee, provided enough good applicants come through of course. If you were to fill these five Sales Executive roles through a traditional recruiter it would cost considerably more.

Separate The Wheat From The Chaff

wheat-shot-by-mountain
The downside to Flat Fee Recruitment is that if your advertisement doesn’t attract the right kind of applicant then there isn’t really a comeback, you’ve already paid for the advertising so if it doesn’t work then you will have to pay again and will still not be sure you will fill your position; although of course, this could happen if an employer were to place their vacancy direct with a job board themselves.

Is Flat Fee for me?

The Flat Fee proposition can be a good one if you are looking to get a job live quickly and can afford to wait if it doesn’t work out the first time the role is posted; if however you need to make sure the right person is in position from the word go then it’s probably advisable to seek the help of a traditional recruitment agency or one of the few companies like Net-Recruit who provide a hybrid service which hopefully gives our customers more choice and control of their recruitment campaigns.

Hopefully the information above will be of some help to those of you who are thinking of dipping your toes in to the world of online recruitment for the first time and will help clarify a few things for those of you who recruit online regularly but have always used a Job Board directly of have used a traditional Recruitment Agency.

If you wish to know more about how we conduct our business here at Net-Recruit please have a look at our article entitled Online Recruitment Explained.


A History of Human Resources

A history of human resourcesBelieve it or not, the principles behind human resources can be traced right back to the prehistoric ages. It is thought that our ancestors developed processes for the selection of tribal leaders, and of course, passed knowledge on health, safety, hunting and gathering down through generations.

A more advanced form of human resource management is known to have come about in China in 1115BC, when the Chinese began using employee screening techniques for recruitment. They were followed by the Greeks, who developed apprenticeship schemes in 2000BC; their model proved so successful that it is still in use today!

Our modern history of human resources in Britain began with the industrial revolution in the late 18th Century. With our focus turning from agricultural to industrial production and the emergence of large factories, a more structured approach to employees and their working conditions became necessary. Although the industrial revolution resulted in the creation of many more jobs, it also widened society’s class divides and presented the problem of unfair pay and hazardous working conditions. Not only this, it brought in a record number of immigrants, who helped fill the many new vacancies but also needed some support in adjusting to their way of life. A growing need for HR professionals suddenly became clear.

Perhaps the first formal HR title was that of the ‘welfare officer’ in the late 19th Century. The welfare officer’s focus was solely on the protection of women and girls in the workplace, who were recruited initially to meet the growing demand for industrial workers, and later in larger numbers to, controversially, fill the gaps left by men who had been called up to fight in the First World War.

As the War ended and Britain regained its workforce, many factories expanded and ‘employment managers’ were introduced to handle recruitment as well as issues surrounding employee conduct and pay. The idea was subsequently taken up by large companies in the newer sectors of industry in the 1930s, as the economy re-established stability.

The Second World War dealt Britain’s economy a further blow, and the placement of welfare officers became compulsory in all factories producing war materials, at the insistence of the National Service and Ministry of Labour. The service that these professionals provided became invaluable, so the term ‘personnel management’ came into play as the war ended in 1945; it was used as an umbrella term for welfare work and employment management.

Personnel management techniques evolved in the 1960s through to the 1980s, as employment strategies developed. Innovative new positions and professional specialists emerged, which in turn meant that screening and management training had to be fine tuned. When the term ‘Human Resource Management’ arrived from the US in the mid 80s, it was quickly adopted by many companies, and as a result specific disciplines of HR began to unfold.

Today, HR professionals have a wealth of employment legislations to contend with, as well as their traditional recruitment, training and personnel duties. The HR sector has grown so significantly in recent years that most mid-size to large companies now have a dedicated HR department. Human Resources qualifications are widely sought after and competition within the sector itself is ever growing!

Related Blogs


    © Net-Recruit 2019